Posts Tagged With: Books

Another lazy library day (Or: On to the next book)

What can I say? Sitting in the library café in the morning sipping an iced coffee is the best.

Reading Haruki Murakami at the library

A lovely Saturday morning at the library

This morning I finished part 2 of Haruki Murakami’s Killing Commendatorea book first mentioned in the last post. It is about a painter, estranged from his wife and temporarily living in an old house in the mountains as its caretaker. The original owner, famed painter Amada Tomohiko, suffers from dementia and resides in a nursing home.

The story unfolds with the ringing of a bell… the simple ringing of a bell. Somehow ringing from beneath a burial mound, beneath countless immovable rocks, at the edge of an old shrine. But when the bell is dug up by the narrator and his rich neighbor, strange events begin to occur and Amada Tomohiko’s past is uncovered, bit by bit. Sweeping the narrator up in its wake.

Advertisements
Categories: Reading | Tags: , | 2 Comments

Days off (Or: Musings in the library)

This past Friday was my birthday. And what better way to celebrate that then taking the day off from work? I am currently in the middle of reading Haruki Murakami’s Killing Commendatore, a novel published over two volumes (about 500 pages each!).

Thus Friday morning was a treat to myself: I went to the central library, ordered an iced coffee, and sat down in the café to read the second volume. In Dutch.

Two reasons that I mention that it was in Dutch:

  1. For some reason this novel won’t be released in English until October. Part 1 has been out since November in Dutch, and part two has been out since January. It’s crazy (but cool) to know you are reading something — and can read something — that hasn’t even been released in English yet.
  2. At some point during the morning I realized that there was a conversation going on to the right of me, at another table. Two women were talking in a mixture of Dutch and English, but since I had my headphones in I hadn’t realized right away. After a few minutes and based on the content of the conversation, I realized that it was probably a taalcoach and taalmaatje (language coach and student) from SamenSpraak.

And it was at that moment when I realized I have come a long way in the last five years, from barely knowing any Dutch to being 700 pages into what is effectively a 1,000+ page novel.

Categories: Reading | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Random reads (Or: An exercise in Dutch)

Last month I posted my reading list for th first half of 2016. So far, July is going even better! I have read about 560 pages (around 18 a day, but I have a hard time sitting down and reading on a daily basis so it is much more varied than that).

Here is a look at some of the books I’ve read in Dutch (or am reading) this month:

1) Never let me go (Laat me nooit alleen) by Kazuo Ishiguro (English | Dutch), a dystopian science fiction novel which follows the lives of three students at a boarding school. But these students (and their classmates) are in fact clones, raised for the sole purpose of providing organs to others once they graduate.

2) The guest cat (De kat) by Takashi Hiraide (English | Dutch), a short book (~160 pages) about a cat who visits a young, work-at-home couple on a daily basis. Free to come and go as he pleases, the cat quickly becomes the centerpiece of their lives, even though he is only a guest.

image

3) Player One (Speler een) by Douglas Coupland (English | Dutch). I just started this one. It follows four people at airport bar over 5 hours as a worldwide disaster begins outside — Karen, who waits on a perspective internet date; Rick, a bartender who no longer drinks; Luke, a pastor who fled with his church’s savings; Rachel, who has trouble connecting with others; and a mysterious voice known only as “Player One”.

4) The Dog Stars (De Hondsster) by Peter Heller (English | Dutch). I haven’t started this one yet. “Hig somehow survived the flu pandemic that killed everyone he knows. Now his wife is gone, his friends are dead, and he lives in the hangar of a small abandoned airport with his dog, Jasper, and a mercurial, gun-toting misanthrope named Bangley.” Hmmm….

And on to August!

Categories: Reading, The Hague | Tags: | 2 Comments

13 1/2 pages (Or: Reading habits the first half of the year)

Earlier in the year I upgraded my library card to the ‘Sterpas’ (Star pass) and decided to start reading more Dutch fiction. The upgrade wasn’t required but I do like keeping a book for four weeks instead of three. I am pleased to say I have read 2,468 pages since the beginning of the year, at a rate of around 13 and a half pages per day. I tend to prefer psychological novels (at least in Dutch). For this type the emphasis is on inner thought and reflection rather than on outward dialogue (Wikipedia: Dutch | English).

Here are the books I read in the first six months of the year, in order:

Vonne van der Meer, De avondboot – 302 pages. It’s actually book two of the Eilandgasten trilogy.

Vonne van der Meer, Laatste seizoen – 192 pages. This is book three of the Eilandgasten trilogy (I’ve linked to the entire work above). I don’t believe it’s been translated into English — only into German, unfortunately.

Eilandgasten trilogie book cover

Robbert Welagen – Het verdwijnen van Robbert, 160 pages. A pretty intriguing read – a man decides one day to get up and leave his old life, without warning. The title translates to “The disappearance of Robbert”.

Continue reading

Categories: Reading | Tags: | 2 Comments

Rrrollend Den Haag (Or: Food trucks… and books)

Yesterday Marco and I had a quick look at the Rrrollend food truck festival at the Lange Voorhout (next to Buitenhof).

The first thing you see when you enter the festival is stacks of books, which caught my eye enough to take a few photos of them:

Books at Buitenhof Den Haag 2

And Buitenhof above:

Books at Buitenhof Den Haag 1

And just the books:

Books at the Rrrollend Food truck festival Den Haag

Categories: The Hague | Tags: , | Leave a comment

A world of books (Or: A new library card)

It is time to renew my library card. Over here in the Netherlands, library card fees are not part your property taxes so you have to pay for one separately. On the plus side, it is pretty inexpensive to get a library card – children’s passes are free, with additional discounts based on age (it’s cheaper if you are 18 to 25 or over 65, for instance).

I’ve always been in love with libraries. I can still remember as a kid checking out 15-20 Hardy Boys mystery books at a time (I never got into the Nancy Drew mystery books, unfortunately). And amazingly, not having that many late books. After that I moved on to the Science fiction / fantasy books section for adults, so my time in the children’s department was over.

Here in the Netherlands I’ve had a basic pass for the last three years – I remember feeling antsy waiting for enough identification proof to come in to be able to get one (like in the US, you need to prove you live where you say you live, so I needed to wait for something to be mailed to me with my name and address on it).

This year, I decided to go with one of the options above the basic one. I went with a Sterpas (Star pass):

Sterpas library card (The Hague)

The main difference is how many books you can check out at a time (12 books versus 18) and how long you can have them (3 weeks versus 4, with two renewals regardless of your card type). To be honest, it’s not like I ever expect to need more than 12 books at a time – I’m not a kid anymore – but the four weeks lending period is nice. There’s a few other benefits, like maximum 18 free reservations (yes, it’s not free in this country like it might be in parts of the US) and free movies/games/etc, rather than paying a euro and a half per piece.

Sterpas library card (The Hague) and website

Library card with the library website behind it

If you’re living in the Netherlands and looking to learn Dutch, keep in mind the Central Library of The Hague has a pretty big collection to help you out. It’s now on the 2nd floor, by the escalators. I’ve previously written about the “Leer Nederlands” collection.

Categories: Reading | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Grand opening (Or: Paagman bookstore on Lange Poten)

As mentioned in a previous blog post, Paagman has officially opened on Lange Poten. Lange Poten 41 was previously a film house, a store called Liefhertje, and a Mercendes Benz store.

Paagman bookstore Lange Poten 1

There are two levels. Like the previous Paagman, the secondhand books are on the upper floor.

Paagman bookstore Lange Poten 4

The roof is rather stunning – so let’s show another picture.

Paagman bookstore Lange Poten 3

And below is a view from the second floor, overlooking the entrance.

Paagman bookstore Lange Poten 2

Of course, if you’re visiting this bookstore, don’t forget to stop in at the American Book Center a few shops down!

Here are more photos of the new bookstore (article in Dutch).

Categories: Culture, The Hague | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Boekrecensie (Or: Eilandgasten bij Vonne van der Meer)

This blog post will be written in Dutch. It is a book review for a fiction book I recently finished. Unfortunately the book is not translated into English but you can read a review in English if you’re interested (or let Google translate take a stab at this blog post).

* * * * * * *

De laatste drie weken heb ik een boek uitgelezen, een boek met de titel “Eilandgasten” bij Vonne van der Meer. Het gaat over verschillende mensen die een vakantiehuis in Vlieland huren tijdens een zomervakantie. In totale zijn er zes korte verhalen. Eigenlijk wilde ik dit bibliotheekboek snel lezen en in een leentermijn terugbrengen. Het was net niet gelukt. Ik heb het op vrijdagavond uitgelezen maar ik moest het op vrijdag ook terugbrengen (dus ik heb de leentermijn verlengd).

Het boek begint met een introductie over het vakantiehuis (met de naam “Duinroos”). In deze introductie is het perspectief van een schoonmaakster, een vrouw die Duinroos (en andere vakantiehuisjes) schoon maakt. Daar hoeft geen dialoog bij; zij is alleen als zij het huisje voorbereidt voor de eerste gasten. Dit geeft de introductie een rustig begin, wat bij een eilandvakantie hoort. Hoewel de schoonmaakster het probeert kan zij niet zien wat er gebeurt. “Soms zou ik willen dat ik dit huis niet alleen schoonhield, maar dat mijn armen de muren waren, mijn ogen de ramen. Dat ik kon zien en horen wat Duinroos meemaakt.” Als zij tussen gasten Duinroos schoonmaakt, vindt ze wat macaroni op de trappen. Ze vindt het vervelend – wie denkt dat de keuken boven ligt? – maar ze was niet erbij om het antwoord te weten. Maar de lezer wel.

Wat ik bijzonder aan het boek vindt is de connectie tussen de huurders hoewel ze nooit op de zelfde tijd het huis gehuurd hebben. De connectie is gemaakt tussen kleine, alledaagse objecten net als een gastenboek, een veertje, en een tak. Of een gast die een halflege fles met augurken in de koelkast laat liggen. “Het gaf hem een prettig gevoel de onbekende die na hem kwamen een plezier te doen.” En dat komt wel terug, maar niet naar zijn wens. Het allerbelangrijkste object is het gastenboek. Heb je ooit door een gastenboek gekeken om te zien welke personen ook hier waren? Een beetje nieuwsgierigheid naar het verleden?

Dit boek was een rustig, kort boek (het was maar 205 pagina’s) dat wel echt spannend was. Het was geweldig om te raden hoe het gastenboek een rol bij dit verhaal speelt, of hoe het veertje terug komt, enzovoort. Hoewel mensen met problemen naar het eiland komen, is Duinroos een plek om hun probleem uit te werken. Zoals Sanne in het gastenboek schrijft: “All shall be well.”

C vdMEER (omnibus) DL rug42.8mm v06.indd

Categories: Reading | Tags: , | Leave a comment

On the move again (Or: Paagman’s moving to Lange Poten 41)

Tonight I visited Paagman’s (a bookstore) on Spuistraat. Before 2014, there was a different bookstore at this location — read my post about what happened to Selexyz. Before that, it was De Slegte, yet another bookstore. Marco tells me that De Slegte was there for ages…

So imagine my surprise when I walk in and see that Paagman’s didn’t last long either!

Paagman's moving to Lange Poten 41

They are moving as well. Not that Lange Poten is that far away; it’s only a few streets from Spuistraat. But we are beginning to think that this particular location might be cursed.

The sign reads: “Paagman’s is opening a new store on Lange Poten 41. We are also bringing the second hand books with! 700 square meters reading, listening and discovering. Books, music, film and coffee.”

Categories: Everyday purchases | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Helemaal uitgelezen (Of: De Brief voor de Koning)

English follows after.

Op vrijdagavond heb ik het boek De Brief voor de Koning uitgelezen. Eerlijk gezegd moet ik ‘helemaal uitgelezen’ gebruiken omdat het een dikke pil voor mij was – ongeeveer 450 paginas! Ik heb andere Nederlandse boeken gelezen, maar niets met zoveel paginas. Ik heb het van de Centraal Bibliotheek geleend and daar was het geclassificeerd als een ‘B’ boek – dus een boek geschikt voor een kind tussen 9 en 12 jaar.

De Brief voor de Koning
De Brief voor de Koning is een heel beroemd boek geschreven door een Nederlandse schrijver, Tonke Dragt, in 1962. Tiuri, de hoofdpersoon, zal ridder worden. Hij moest alleen in de kapel overnachten, zonder niets te doen of zeggen en wakker te blijven. Maar ineens hoorde Tiuri een klop op de deur – iemand vroeg voor hulp. Zou hij de deur openen (een ridder moet mensen helpen, toch?) of zou hij niets doen (en de regels volgen om een ridder te worden)? Uiteindelijk ging hij naar de deur en daar begon zijn verhaal en avontuur – hij moest een brief aan een andere koning geven, een koning in een heel ver weg rijk. Maar de vijand was niet ver achter hem…
Ik weet niet meer hoe lang ik bezig was met het lezen van het boek – sinds september? oktober? Maar nu is het helemaal uitgelezen. Ik heb al het vervolg geleend – Geheimen van het Wilde Woud. Dit heeft misschien 465 paginas. Hmmm…

(Bedankt aan mijn SamenSpraak taalcoach – hij heeft me met het boek geholpen).

De Brief voor de Koning binnen

On Friday evening I finished reading De Brief voor de Koning (The Letter for the King, English wikipedia).  If I am honest I must say ‘finally finished’ because it was a very thick book – about 450 pages. I have read other Dutch books but nothing with so many pages. I borrowed it from the Centraal Bibliotheek (Central Library) and they classified it as a ‘B’ book – a book for 9-12 year olds.
De Brief voor de Koning is a very famous book written by a Dutch writer, Tonke Dragt, in 1962. Tiuri, the main character, is about to become a knight. He must only stay in the chapel overnight, without doing or saying anything, and stay awake. But suddenly he hears a knock on the door – someone asked for help. Should he open the door (a knight must help the people, right?) or should he do nothing (and follow the rules to become a knight?). In the end he went to the door. From there his story and adventure begins – he must deliver a letter to a King in a different kingdom. But enemies weren’t far behind…
I don’t know how long I was busy with reading this book – since September? October? But now I have read it cover to cover. I also borrowed the sequel – Geheimen van het Wilde Woud (Secrets from the Wild Forest). This one has about 465 pages. Hmmm.

Thanks to my SamenSpraak coach – he helped me with reading the book.

Categories: Reading | Tags: , , | 4 Comments

Blog at WordPress.com.